Saturday, October 22, 2011

Major De La Fuente backpeddles on Peace and Equality Mural

22nd October, 2011

The mayor has forgotten that The Orange Walk District has many gay voters who have taken notice of his backpeddling on the Peace and Equality Mural. Covering the mural is not only a slap in the face of gay voters in the district, but symbolic of how politicians so easily sweep rights under the cover for any of its citizens. See how on October 11th, Major De la Fuente was support of the Mural through this news coverage covered by PlusTV....see link for video coverage as well.
(http://ambergriscaye.com/forum/ubbthreads.php/topics/418503/Re_Gay_pride_logo_painted_on_O.html)

PLUSTV COVERAGE 11th October, 2011

Just last week, the US Ambassador to Belize, Vinai Thumallapaly, handed over checks to eight organizations who work in some capacity with HIV and AIDS related issues. As we’ve reported, at least two of those organizations are actively promoting the homosexual agenda in Belize and one of them, UNIBAM, is presently challenging the constitutionality of Belize’s sodomy laws. Well, today, was a significant victory for those promoting the homosexual agenda in Belize. That is because the Mayor of Orange Walk Town made a proclamation on behalf of the citizens of that Town that today Tuesday, October 11th, is officially declared Peace and Equality Day. PICS This happened at the unveiling of a mural painted on the wall of the Orange Walk Town Hall. That mural was designed and painted by a youth group called EquALL Belize. The group was founded by a Peace Corp volunteer, Zachary Pullin, for the main purpose of getting young people to advocate for the homosexual agenda in Belize. The US Ambassador was also present at today’s unveiling of that mural. That mural displays a rainbow and as you probably know, the rainbow of multi colors is the symbol used by the LGBT and Gay Pride organizations. Prior to the unveiling, Mayor Philip de la Fuente made a proclamation saying that “Orange Walk Town has long fostered and supported diversity and acceptance; and WHEREAS, peace, tolerance, acceptance and equality benefit the families and youth in Orange Walk; and WHEREAS, on this day, a Peace and Equality Day is planned in Orange Walk, featuring the unveiling of a colorful and exciting mural that promotes peace, tolerance, acceptance and equality at the Town Hall for our entire community to enjoy and support”. We spoke to the Mayor this afternoon about his proclamation.

Phillip de la Fuente, Mayor of Orange Walk Town
Peace and equality, that is something I think all leaders should be working towards. If we would have peace and equality, this world would be a better place to live in, because peace and equality is when everyone is considered equal.

Louis Wade Jr.
Are there people in your town who are less equal than others at this time and who are those people?

Phillip de la Fuente, Mayor of Orange Walk Town

Actually I wouldn’t say less equal, but they are less privileged. Let’s be real, the bulk of Belizeans I would say are less fortunate; some of them have a hard time getting their kids to school and paying school fees and things like that and that’s when the ones who are more fortunate should assist. Equality is when we try to make everyone equal; just because I have more does not mean that I am more important than you.

Louis Wade Jr.
Those people who you consider to be less equal in Orange Walk include the homosexual community?

Phillip de la Fuente, Mayor of Orange Walk Town
I would say definitely say so because they are a smaller group, but again the tolerance is there, because people put up with it, but that is their belief, that is not mine. Orange Walk on a whole is a very religious community and would not tolerate the other group, the smaller group, trying to impose.

According to the Mayor, he was unaware that EquALL and its founder are advocates of the homosexual agenda even though Pullin’s objectives and agendas are clearly stated on his internet site.

Phillip de la Fuente, Mayor of Orange Walk Town
I would proudly like to have an open meeting after I discuss the issues with my Town Council so that we can decide what we will do. Anything that would assist my municipality to move forward, we would be more than happy to embrace.
Louis Wade Jr.

Even if it includes the homosexual agenda?

Phillip de la Fuente, Mayor of Orange Walk Town
As long as we know exactly what we are dealing with, yes. I am speaking for myself. I have some friends who are from the other side, but they do not impose their beliefs on me, and I am speaking for myself. If the group would come out and say that they are specifically targeting those groups, I would not be able to stop; I would not want to stop them, but I would then have to re-think the way I am working, but now I am working openly with everything.

Orange Walk pastor Antonette Young says that there are many things that a society should never tolerate. She says that too many people still don’t understand that intolerance of sin does not mean inequality in any way as God loves all equally, even though he does not tolerate sin.

Antonette Young, Orange Walk Pastor

The logo on the wall, which is the rainbow, is the international symbol for the homosexuals which signifies to them, gay rights. According to the Word of God, homosexuality is an abomination to the Lord and us as Christians cannot pretty it up; we cannot compromise, we cannot say that it is not wrong, because if we say that, as spiritual leaders, we will also be in the same category of the ones who are denying what the Word of God says. The logo on the wall, to me, is an insult because Orange Walk is declaring a day that represents homosexuality or equality that would allow men and women in the gay community to marry. It is an abomination to the Lord and it is very sad to see that our nation is coming to this point. There is no way we need to publicly have this as an awareness to our young people. If we are saying that our youth are the future of the nation then we must steer them in the right way, and the right way is God’s way.

According to a press release, the Peace and Equality initiative has been spearheaded by DAVCO (District Association of Village Councils), Peace Corps Volunteer Zachary Pullin and the Orange Walk Town Council

MAYOR NOW BACKPEDDLES ON HIS POSITION OF SUPPORT in love fm news coverage below.

CONTROVERSY OVER MURAL IN ORANGE WALK

October 13, 2011

A mural depicting peace and equality is causing a stir in Orange Walk .The painting was the brainchild of peace corp volunteer, Zachary Pullin, and Equal Belize, a local youth group. With the permission of Orange Walk Mayor, Philip de la Fuente, the group painted the mural on the fence wall of the Orange Walk Town Council. When it was unveiled yesterday, it caused certain segments of this community to call for its removal. Zachary Pullin describes the mural.

Zachary Pullin – Artist
“It’s a two part thing it’s on two tablets of the wall and the first part is a man, I would say interpretation would be that he is kind of just proclaiming, just yelling and shouting out in a very positive way, love, peace, quality, acceptance and tolerance and that is signified by a multi colored rainbow which is a creation of God. Unfortunately people want to interpret that one way but it’s important that they understand the intention behind it which is that a rainbow with as many colors as it has is symbolic of the fact that its exactly what our culture is here in Belize.”

Since the 1970's , the rainbow has been used on the gay pride flags as a symbol of lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender pride or rights and it is the rainbow on the mural that is causing the contention.

Pastor Antonette Young
“The painting on the wall it’s clearly sending the wrong message. The rainbow is the logo for homosexuality internationally, we have to teach our young people and the right way is God’s way. Do you know what the word of God tells us, in Leviticus 20:13, it tell us “If a man lies with a male as he lies with a woman, both of them have committed an abomination to the Lord and they shall surely be put to death, their blood shall be upon them”. It tells in Deuteronomy 22:5, “A woman shall not wear anything that pertains to a man, nor shall a man put on a woman’s garment, for all who do so are an abomination to the Lord, your God.” God does not make a mistake in gender, a woman is a woman, a man is a man.”

Pullin says this is all just a misinterpretation.

Zachary Pullin – Artist
“Nobody ever asked me what the interpretation was, so I appreciate their being enthusiastic about it. I am so thankful you’re coming to ask about the interpretation, the intention behind it but for me a rainbow is God’s creation, it’s not something that we own, it is something God owns I think and to see someone project their interpretation on it and that be the final word, I don’t think it is fair to the work we have been doing and the incredible progress Orange Walk has made in peace and equality and love and acceptance and tolerance.”

Manuela Ayuso Cantun
Does this mural have anything to do with promoting gay rights in Orange Walk?

Zachary Pullin – Artist
“It absolutely did not.”

Orange Walk Mayor has come under criticism for allowing the painting on the wall.

Phillip de la Fuente – Mayor, Orange Walk Town
“He showed us a rough sketch of it, and that was when I spoke to the Deputy Mayor and we decided to give him the permission to go ahead. As to the allegations, I wasn’t aware of anything like that. Now I am getting a lot of negative feedback about that painting so to give everybody a fair chance I will approach the gentleman and ask him if he is pushing any specific agenda and then I will have to make a decision after that.”
source:(http://www.lovefm.com/ndisplay.php?nid=14817)

Saturday, October 15, 2011

How the Caribbean Region is watching section 53

October 15th, 2011

Jamaica Observer

challenge to constitution by gay activists

Wednesday, May 25, 2011
BELMOPAN, Belize (CMC) — The Belize Council of Churches (BCC) has filed an application in the Supreme Court joining the Attorney General's Office in opposing a case brought by the United Belize Advocacy Movement (UNIBAM) that seeks to deny rights to gay people.
UNIBAM and its executive president, Caleb Orosco, are challenging Section 53 of the Criminal Code, which states that carnal intercourse against the order of nature is an indictable matter which carries a prison sentence of up to 10 years.
UNIBAM is seeking to have the law declared unconstitutional since gays can face prison time for sexual preferences.
But the BCC said its motion to argue the validity of the law presents a moral argument despite its origin within the Constitution.
"Nobody should be shocked or surprised. The church is the moral authority within the context of the nation and therefore it is the church's view that the very challenge that has been brought against the attorney general is really an attack on the teachings of the church and therefore has made its stand known," said the BCC representative Canon Leroy Flowers.
"This should not be a thing new to anyone. We see this as another undermining of the very moral fibre of the society and while there are many members who may not necessarily agree with the church's position. The church has got to maintain its stance [and] its understanding but more importantly as a society we've said the very preamble of our constitution talks about the supremacy of God.
"You can't talk about the supremacy of God and then undermine the very thing that seeks to uphold that principle and we feel that a part of that principle has to be between a man and a woman and not a man and a man or two women for that matter or a man and an animal as it were.
"Now this does not in any way signify the purity of the church. It simply seeks to challenge what we believe to be part of the moral fibre of our nation," he added.
But Orosco has defended the decision to challenge the matter in court.
"Our case isn't unique in terms of what we're trying to do. We're using a democratic tool. The tool is the Supreme Court and the use of the Constitution. We are not unique in terms of bringing constitutional challenges.
"There are other groups which have done that and have used the court for finding redress so our case is not unique in that regard. Beyond them politicising the sexual rights of individuals that they know nothing about really is a dirty.
"What it means is that gay people or gay men in particular, bisexual men in particular have stood up for basic human rights. What is means is that this case will and have generated a discussion on the basic consciousness of every individual in this country," Orosco said, questioning how would you treat your own blood if they were gay?"

Read more: http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/news/Church-joins-State-in-opposing-challenge-to-constitution-by-gay-activists_8843556#ixzz1auX5R7wY






News from St. Lucia August 26th, 2011
 
CASTRIES, St. Lucia, CMC – Attorney General Rudolph Francis Friday said that calls for the St. Lucia government to repeal the islands anti-buggery laws will depend on the outcome of a legal challenge to a similar law in Belize.
“We have heard the calls from more than one quarter, but we plan to adopt a wait and see attitude on the matter as our law could be affected by a legal challenge currently being heard in Belize,” Francis told reporters.
At least three organisations, including the AIDS Action Foundation (AAF), have been calling on the Stephenson King administration to annul the law.
AAF’s director and a member of the Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition, Veronica Cenac,
said that the current laws on buggery were passed during the era of colonisation and needs to be repealed.
Cenac an attorney said that the laws made a significant contribution to the spread of the HIV/AIDS virus since it made gays reluctant to come forward for testing.
“The buggery law has, particularly from the perspective of the AIDS Action Foundation assisted greatly in promoting the spread of HIV, because most persons who are gay would not turn up for testing or see doctors and because being gay is still taboo in our society most men who are gay have relationships with females and that encourages the spread of AIDS as well,” Cenac noted.
But the Attorney General said the government is monitoring, with keen interest, the legal challenge to buggery laws in Belize by a human rights organisation that also wants the law repealed.
He said the issue is very sensitive and has to be dealt with “kids’ gloves.”
“When it comes to such laws, they can be very conflicting as many different organisations in any society will have different views on the matter, so we are listening with interest to the debate locally and in the region, and being the dynamic government that we are, we would want to know that any decisions we arrive at will be in keeping with the times, with the religious beliefs of our society and the culture of the society.
“As difficult as that is, we will seek to ensure that any decision we take will not offend anyone or would be in keeping with the feelings of the majority,” Francis said, refusing to comment on whether St. Lucia can be considered a homophobic society. source: (http://www.antiguaobserver.com/?p=63639)

The twisted nature of critics and our friends on Plus TV

0ctober 15th, 2011

Once again Plus TV was up to no good as they interviewed Mayor de la fuente who for the first time made broad statements on tolerance in Orange Walk town on the 11th October. Then when loveTV came he sounded like he was backtracking. "To allow jumping jesus freaks" to set our human rights agenda is to facilitate an erosion of our constitution. While was going the National dialogue was taking place to explore the broader agenda of human rights committment. Here are the story and the positive statements made in Orange Walk on Peace and Equality Day October 11th, 2011.
Just last week, the US Ambassador to Belize, Vinai Thumallapaly, handed over checks to eight organizations who work in some capacity with HIV and AIDS related issues. As we’ve reported, at least two of those organizations are actively promoting the homosexual agenda in Belize and one of them, UNIBAM, is presently challenging the constitutionality of Belize’s sodomy laws. Well, today, was a significant victory for those promoting the homosexual agenda in Belize. That is because the Mayor of Orange Walk Town made a proclamation on behalf of the citizens of that Town that today Tuesday, October 11th, is officially declared Peace and Equality Day. PICS This happened at the unveiling of a mural painted on the wall of the Orange Walk Town Hall. That mural was designed and painted by a youth group called EquALL Belize. The group was founded by a Peace Corp volunteer, Zachary Pullin, for the main purpose of getting young people to advocate for the homosexual agenda in Belize. The US Ambassador was also present at today’s unveiling of that mural. That mural displays a rainbow and as you probably know, the rainbow of multi colors is the symbol used by the LGBT and Gay Pride organizations. Prior to the unveiling, Mayor Philip de la Fuente made a proclamation saying that “Orange Walk Town has long fostered and supported diversity and acceptance; and WHEREAS, peace, tolerance, acceptance and equality benefit the families and youth in Orange Walk; and WHEREAS, on this day, a Peace and Equality Day is planned in Orange Walk, featuring the unveiling of a colorful and exciting mural that promotes peace, tolerance, acceptance and equality at the Town Hall for our entire community to enjoy and support”. We spoke to the Mayor this afternoon about his proclamation.

Phillip de la Fuente, Mayor of Orange Walk Town
Peace and equality, that is something I think all leaders should be working towards. If we would have peace and equality, this world would be a better place to live in, because peace and equality is when everyone is considered equal.

Louis Wade Jr.
Are there people in your town who are less equal than others at this time and who are those people?

Phillip de la Fuente, Mayor of Orange Walk Town

Actually I wouldn’t say less equal, but they are less privileged. Let’s be real, the bulk of Belizeans I would say are less fortunate; some of them have a hard time getting their kids to school and paying school fees and things like that and that’s when the ones who are more fortunate should assist. Equality is when we try to make everyone equal; just because I have more does not mean that I am more important than you.

Louis Wade Jr.
Those people who you consider to be less equal in Orange Walk include the homosexual community?
Phillip de la Fuente, Mayor of Orange Walk Town
I would say definitely say so because they are a smaller group, but again the tolerance is there, because people put up with it, but that is their belief, that is not mine. Orange Walk on a whole is a very religious community and would not tolerate the other group, the smaller group, trying to impose.

According to the Mayor, he was unaware that EquALL and its founder are advocates of the homosexual agenda even though Pullin’s objectives and agendas are clearly stated on his internet site.

Phillip de la Fuente, Mayor of Orange Walk Town
I would proudly like to have an open meeting after I discuss the issues with my Town Council so that we can decide what we will do. Anything that would assist my municipality to move forward, we would be more than happy to embrace.
Louis Wade Jr.

Even if it includes the homosexual agenda?

Phillip de la Fuente, Mayor of Orange Walk Town
As long as we know exactly what we are dealing with, yes. I am speaking for myself. I have some friends who are from the other side, but they do not impose their beliefs on me, and I am speaking for myself. If the group would come out and say that they are specifically targeting those groups, I would not be able to stop; I would not want to stop them, but I would then have to re-think the way I am working, but now I am working openly with everything.

Orange Walk pastor Antonette Young says that there are many things that a society should never tolerate. She says that too many people still don’t understand that intolerance of sin does not mean inequality in any way as God loves all equally, even though he does not tolerate sin.

Antonette Young, Orange Walk Pastor

The logo on the wall, which is the rainbow, is the international symbol for the homosexuals which signifies to them, gay rights. According to the Word of God, homosexuality is an abomination to the Lord and us as Christians cannot pretty it up; we cannot compromise, we cannot say that it is not wrong, because if we say that, as spiritual leaders, we will also be in the same category of the ones who are denying what the Word of God says. The logo on the wall, to me, is an insult because Orange Walk is declaring a day that represents homosexuality or equality that would allow men and women in the gay community to marry. It is an abomination to the Lord and it is very sad to see that our nation is coming to this point. There is no way we need to publicly have this as an awareness to our young people. If we are saying that our youth are the future of the nation then we must steer them in the right way, and the right way is God’s way.

According to a press release, the Peace and Equality initiative has been spearheaded by DAVCO (District Association of Village Councils), Peace Corps Volunteer Zachary Pullin and the Orange Walk Town Council. source: 
http://ambergriscaye.com/forum/ubbthreads.php/topics/418503/Re_Gay_pride_logo_painted_on_O.html

 The next story from love FM seem to have them backtracking support of the mural and reports from people in orange Walk is that the mural was once again covered. The side story is that the Pastor young, brother was killed in his house and she had the nerve to say that is was retribution for living in sin. What kind of christian is that with no heart. See the link to LOVEFM news...http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X_OCDPqclAU&feature=related
See also the words of both organizers below.

CONTROVERSY OVER MURAL IN ORANGE WALK
October 13, 2011
A mural depicting peace and equality is causing a stir in Orange Walk .The painting was the brainchild of peace corp volunteer, Zachary Pullin, and Equal Belize, a local youth group. With the permission of Orange Walk Mayor, Philip de la Fuente, the group painted the mural on the fence wall of the Orange Walk Town Council. When it was unveiled yesterday, it caused certain segments of this community to call for its removal. Zachary Pullin describes the mural.

Zachary Pullin – Artist
“It’s a two part thing it’s on two tablets of the wall and the first part is a man, I would say interpretation would be that he is kind of just proclaiming, just yelling and shouting out in a very positive way, love, peace, quality, acceptance and tolerance and that is signified by a multi colored rainbow which is a creation of God. Unfortunately people want to interpret that one way but it’s important that they understand the intention behind it which is that a rainbow with as many colors as it has is symbolic of the fact that its exactly what our culture is here in Belize.”

Since the 1970's , the rainbow has been used on the gay pride flags as a symbol of lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender pride or rights and it is the rainbow on the mural that is causing the contention.

Pastor Antonette Young
“The painting on the wall it’s clearly sending the wrong message. The rainbow is the logo for homosexuality internationally, we have to teach our young people and the right way is God’s way. Do you know what the word of God tells us, in Leviticus 20:13, it tell us “If a man lies with a male as he lies with a woman, both of them have committed an abomination to the Lord and they shall surely be put to death, their blood shall be upon them”. It tells in Deuteronomy 22:5, “A woman shall not wear anything that pertains to a man, nor shall a man put on a woman’s garment, for all who do so are an abomination to the Lord, your God.” God does not make a mistake in gender, a woman is a woman, a man is a man.”

Pullin says this is all just a misinterpretation.

Zachary Pullin – Artist
“Nobody ever asked me what the interpretation was, so I appreciate their being enthusiastic about it. I am so thankful you’re coming to ask about the interpretation, the intention behind it but for me a rainbow is God’s creation, it’s not something that we own, it is something God owns I think and to see someone project their interpretation on it and that be the final word, I don’t think it is fair to the work we have been doing and the incredible progress Orange Walk has made in peace and equality and love and acceptance and tolerance.”

Manuela Ayuso Cantun
Does this mural have anything to do with promoting gay rights in Orange Walk?

Zachary Pullin – Artist
“It absolutely did not.”

Orange Walk Mayor has come under criticism for allowing the painting on the wall.

Phillip de la Fuente – Mayor, Orange Walk Town
“He showed us a rough sketch of it, and that was when I spoke to the Deputy Mayor and we decided to give him the permission to go ahead. As to the allegations, I wasn’t aware of anything like that. Now I am getting a lot of negative feedback about that painting so to give everybody a fair chance I will approach the gentleman and ask him if he is pushing any specific agenda and then I will have to make a decision after that.”
http://www.lovefm.com/ndisplay.php?nid=14817





LGBT media advocacy and controversy in Belize- critics and dialogue

October 15th, 2011

The last few weeks have been super busy, in advocacy. In Janelle Chanona stories on LGBT concerns she broaden the discussion from section 53 to myths and misperceptions. Here is a link to the first story while the second story follows. The coverage is channel 7

The Homosexuality Debate in Belize: Should the state legislate morality?
posted (July 28, 2011)
Homosexuality has always been one of those things that everyone accepts is part of the Belizean society but no one addresses publicly, least of all on a legal or policy level. But the case of the United Belize Advocacy Movement versus the Attorney General of Belize, which is asking for the decriminalization of sodomy, has changed all that. In the build up to the trial, the issue is being discussed in detail in churches, at work, on the streets and in homes across the country. Tonight 7 News correspondent Janelle Chanona presents part one of a documentary on the Belizean reality of homosexuality. Dean Barrow, Prime Minister of Belize, May 13th 2011
"I would limit myself to saying that the government as a government has taken the position that it needs to argue for the constitutionality of the law that is in place that's being challenged and so I would not go beyond that official position. I am not prepared to comment on my own physiological conviction or lack thereof. That is the official position of the government. This is one time when it might be wise for me to say nothing more."
Pastor Scott Stirm, Jubilee Ministries, Belmopan
"By natural law they cannot reproduce. Therefore they must recruit and I want to say this in the strongest terms possible. That's what this is all about. This is their evangelistic campaign."
Martha Carillo, Regional Discrimination Unit, PANCAP, CARICOM
"It is not about changing people's values, even to seek acceptance. I think the bottom line is that people need to be respected and we cannot have laws that disrespect the human rights of individuals."
Johnny Briceno, Leader of the Opposition
"The party does not have a position as yet and we'll certainly have to discuss as a party before we have a position."
Pastor Louis Wade Junior, Talk Show Host, Christian Youth Motivational Speaker
"We love people. We love these people. We love all people. It is the behavior that we have a problem with."
Caleb Orozco, Executive President, United Belize Advocacy Movement
"I am willing to sacrifice whatever it takes to enforce my right and my freedom and to meet the needs of my wellbeing as a human being."
Janelle Chanona (stand-up)
"The subject of sex is typically an uncomfortable topic for Belizeans. But the debate over whether the laws should be changed to decriminalize sodomy in this country has ignited fiery reactions from both supporters and opponents."
As it currently stands, the Criminal Code of Belize states that “Every person who has carnal knowledge against the order of nature with any person or animal shall be liable for imprisonment for ten years.” But in early 2011, Caleb Orozco, the Executive President of the United Belize Advocacy Movement (UNIBAM) filed for judicial review of the law, contending that the words “any person or” should be removed because they are a violation of his Constitutional right to sexual freedom.
Caleb Orozco, Executive Director, UNIBAM
"The case is personal and it’s about reminding the system that my human rights isn’t about picking and choosing which you’ll support and which you will ignore. My human rights is total. It’s not to be mandated by the church because the church does not govern this country. Period."
If the law is changed, Belize would be only the second Caribbean country to decriminalize sodomy...Bahamas being the first. In May, that possible outcome prompted the Belize Council of Churches, which represents the major Christian denominations of Belize, as well as the Belize Association of Evangelical Churches to join the case as interested parties. The religious leaders insist Belize’s very soul is at stake.
Bishop Dorrick Wright, Bishop, Roman Catholic Diocese of Belize
"We have the story from the old testament of Sodom and Gomorrah, God destroyed a whole country, a whole place because of this same reason. I am not certain if he will do this to the United States where it seems to be popular and getting very common, but I don't think we have to follow what the United States does and I think we should think for ourselves and see what would be the evil outcome of this whole thing if we get into changing the laws of our country to permit same sex marriage and children must be taught that this is an acceptable way of life and you know its just down right wrong."
Good morning Belize and welcome to another edition of Rise and Shine, my name is Louis Wade.
One of the most vocal opponents to the gay rights case has been talk show host and Christian Youth motivational speaker, Pastor Louis Wade Junior.
Pastor Louis Wade Junior, Talk Show Host/Motivational Speaker
"Mark my words, it starts with one lawsuit, when this lawsuit is over, if they get their way, the next set of lawsuits will be against the social security board and other large organizations, insurance companies that must give compensation not only a person but also to their spouse. The third set of litigation is going to be church and religious denominations across the nation when they refuse to marry homosexual couples. And then the final set of mass litigation will be against people who stand up and say that this kind of practice is wrong."
Pastor Scott Stirm, Jubilee Ministries, Belmopan
"Presently in the United Kingdom, there are lawsuits trying to lower the age of consent. That proves to me, the agenda. They are after the children, they are recruiting campaigns and it’s for people that have, I would say, demented sexual practices and they want to go after the kids. That is happening globally, all over the world. It’s called the child sex trade and this is another expression of that same exact agenda. They want to go to younger and younger ages. And again, these are the things that cause us to stand up and rise with a lion’s roar and say “no way”, we will not allow this to happen, not only our watch."
Both Wade and his Christian colleague Pastor Scott Stirm insist that no one is born gay and maintain Belize’s laws should uphold rights, not choices.
Pastor Scott Stirm, Jubilee Ministries
"It’s a learnt behavior...it’s something people pick up along the way. But I have ministered to I would say countless people, particularly in sexual abuse situations and the majority of them have been sexually abused. When you understand clinical homosexual behavior and clinical homosexual foundations, the absence of the fatherly role plays a huge factor. So you have people that have classic foundations for homosexuality. But then you have other people that just pick up from basic influence of perversion or exposing to pornography and the power of suggestion and things like that."
Louis Wade, Jr., Christian Youth Motivation Speaker, Talk Show Host
"If they are born that way, it will be found in their genes. Where is the gene? I have met ex-gays and ex-lesbians but I have never met ex-blacks person, this is not a civil rights issue."
Similarly strong sentiments were also voiced in February 1998 when the cruise ship the MS Leeward docked in Belize carrying eight hundred and sixty gay men onboard. For Orozco, that incident and his own experiences highlights that he is living in a homophobic society, which is why the majority of Belizean men who have sex with men live secret lives.
Caleb Orozco, Executive President, UNIBAM
"Some of the things they say were like faggot, bonefire, they basically use a lot of the Jamaican dancehall slangs to let me know where my place is and that’s rather frustrating because all I was doing was going to buy condense milk. I don’t believe that I deserve to be treated like that especially if I’m not looking at you or harassing you in any way."
"I need my freedom to be honest with people. I perpetuate my own discrimination or my own experience of homophobia by remaining silent."
Martha Carillo, Technical Associate, Regional Stigma and Discrimination Unit, PANCAP, CARICOM
"Very few people will come to a workshop, very few people will access services at a health centre if they know the minute they step in they are going to be ridiculed or they are going to be treated any less than anybody else."
Martha Carillo is Technical Associate of the PANCAP Regional Stigma and Discrimination Unit. Carillo recently concluded a baseline study on stigma and discrimination with various focus groups, the media, the police, the Belize Defence Force and the religious community about populations such as men who have sex with men.
Martha Carillo, Technical Associate, Stigma and Discrimination Unit, PANCAP
"The preliminary findings are indicating that stigma and discrimination are very much alive in Belize and it is coming from sectors that make it even more scarier for all of us. Because you would think that some of these would be sectors that would be embracing, loving, protecting, providing security and the experiences that have been shared with us indicate to us that we really are living in a critical situation and something needs to be done. And if we have laws, practices and policies that are contributing to this then it needs to be addressed in a very frank and genuine manner."
Ivan Cruikshank, Policy and Advocacy Coordinator, Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition
"The most effect response to address HIV and AIDS has to be addressing the social and legal environment, within the country."
According to Ivan Cruickshank, Policy and Advocacy Coordinator of the Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition, countries with high HIV prevalence rates, like Belize, should be supporting every effort to eradicate stigma and discrimination to curb the spread of the disease.
Ivan Cruikshank
"At all levels we are saying to policy makers, review your existing legal and policy environment so that people feel that this is a space that they can come forward and engage with the health care system...that’s a big issue for us."
Maurice Tomlinson, AIDS Free World
"This is about bringing everybody to the table, not leaving anybody out. Because when you exclude people, that is when you provide an opportunity for harm and hate and disease to spread. And these diseases don’t generally stay within the vulnerable groups."
Pastor Louis Wade Junior
"It is a lie. The evidence shows for example in Belize that HIV and AIDs is driven not by the homosexual community but by the heterosexual community. That is well defined in Belize. It is also well defined throughout the Caribbean."
The pastors refute the argument that laws criminalizing sodomy have a direct relation to HIV prevalence rates.
Louis Wade
"I am talking about statistics in European, in England, in Canada, in the United States, in Sweden. These are places where homosexuals have the most freedom in the world, MSM - they have the most freedom, this is where they are not in the closet. Yet the statistics are showing that the HIV rate continues to rise in their circles."
Pastor Scott Stirm, Jubilee Ministries
"At a United Nations level, they have an agenda, they are people in there that that have an agenda and they are pushing that agenda and one of the things that is fueling some of this in Belize is the financial aid that comes from the European Union is coming with stipulations that you must change these laws or we are going to cut you off financially, 'you won’t get any more assistance from us’ and so that’s one of the factors when we talk about why are people hemming and hawing over this issue, it’s because there’s big bucks behind it."
Caleb Orozco
"They are free to form an opinion; an opinion does not provide the basis for reality. It simply offers an expression or description of an issue. Period."
"Cultural attitude isn’t going to change because of one judgment...because of the misrepresentation of the facts and the fear mongering being sold by the religious politicians. There will be years and years around what really is sexual orientation and to an extent, gender identity and what does that actually mean for the individual."
Janelle Chanona (stand-up)
"In the months leading up to this trial, proponents and opponents of this issue will no doubt campaign heavily in their efforts to help you answer the fundamental question of this case: “Should the state legislate morality?” Because make no mistake, whatever decision is handed down in the courtroom, keeping the status quo or changing attitudes towards sexual minorities will be decided on in the court of public opinion. Reporting for 7News I am Janelle Chanona."
The case of Caleb Orozco versus the Attorney General of Belize is scheduled to go to trial in December 2011. UNIBAM's legal team includes former Attorney General of the United Kingdom Lord Peter Goldsmith, former Attorney General of Belize Godfrey Smith and Senior Counsel Lisa Shoman. The churches have retained Senior Counsels Rodwell Williams and Eamon Courtenay as well as Jackie Marshallek, Christopher Coye and Michel Chebat. source: http://www.7newsbelize.com/sstory.php?nid=20218&frmsrch=1

In the second story and compared two lesbian expereinces. One that prayed the gay away while the other is a proud lesbian. The story in my mind explored the realities of sexuality. Here is a link to the second story...

Can You Pray Away Gay?
posted (October 12, 2011)
It's been reported in Belize and all over the world: Belize's sodomy laws are being challenged by UNIBAM, the United Belize Advocacy Movement. UNIBAM has taken it to the Supreme Court, and the trial is pending. At the end of July, 7news Special Correspondent Janelle Chanona examined the many arguments for and against the taking sodomy off the law books in Belize.
That was part one of her story - and part two, which we present tonight, takes a different tack; it takes the argument from the organizations to the individuals.
Janelle spoke with two Belizean women: one who is unapologetically gay, and another who says that - with prayer - she turned away from her life as a lesbian.
Two different perspectives on a very divisive issue - and here's Janelle's report:
Janelle Chanona Reporting
Melissa Mossiah - Prayed Away Gay
"My name is Melissa Mossiah. I don't think I have to say my age right?"
Simone Hill - Not Ashamed of Being a Lesbian
"I am a person, a human being. I'm Simone Hill, born to two parents that loved me."
The two Belizean women you are about to meet have very different stories about their sexual identities.
Melissa Mossiah
"I know how I used to feel, how I used to think. You get me? And that is not like - I can't convince people of anything, but just stating the fact that I am not the same. It's just unique. This was something that happened between me and God."
Melissa Mossiah says she lived as lesbian for much of her teenaged and early adulthood years because of events that occurred in her childhood.
Melissa Mossiah
"I was a little girl that matured very fast, you know. And so, a man took advantage of me, and innocently, he raped me and I couldn't tell anybody. I couldn't say anything, I couldn't even tell my dad. I was always around my dad; we were very close with each other. But I couldn't tell anybody. I couldn't speak any at all, and the only reason why is because this guy threatened me. Right after that, another scenery unfold and that was with my dad who had an affair, and it was right there in the middle of that, I started having a hatred built up towards men. And so this thing, the desires for females started building up now, because I am going to take care of these females. I am going to risk my life that no men do them anything. That was my mind; that's was what I was thinking."
Mossiah says her beliefs in God clashed with her lesbian life and led to anger, depression and even thoughts of suicide. She found comfort in Bible-based counseling after she moved in with her pastor's family. Eight years later, the young woman says she is no longer a lesbian.
Melissa Mossiah
"The transformation in my mind reflects the transformation outside, okay, because I am so comfortable, Janelle. I got to my bed, and I don't have to be thinking of how to gratifying my flesh, how to feed me, because how I used to make this things, how I used to build upon these desires and these feelings, I watched pornography. Pornography was introduced to Burrell Boom, after those couple years. And so that's how I used to feed myself. But the thing is, afterwards it just makes you feel empty, it doesn't satisfy you. But not only that, I used to masturbate as well. So all this, I was trying to help - something- but it didn't work. When the process began it was a struggle because I still had the desires. I still had the thoughts but, like I said, when the word started getting into my mind, and my pastor was really down-to-earth person when it comes to the word, because he is going to nail it in. And so getting that word in, when I go home, I think upon it. I'm in the bathroom and I'm thinking upon it. And so, that word, Janelle, was what transformed my entire mind, that when I look at female, they are beautiful just like myself. And God created them just as how he created me."
Janelle Chanona
"But you are not sexually attracted to her?"
Melissa Mossiah
"No, not anymore. I can't explain to you how God did what He did to me. I don't know how to explain that, but anytime you get connected with Him. That is what I wanted, a wanted a change"
Simone Hill
"We were born into a family; we are just like the next person. If you cut us, we bleed."
We approached several members of the gay and lesbian community to participate in this documentary; all but one declined, saying they were afraid of how their families and friends would react; what their bosses would say or how their businesses would suffer.
Simone Hill shares many of those concerns but felt that by publicly sharing her story, she could put another human face to the public debate.
Simone Hill
"I knew what I was feeling from I was ten years old, but I never explored these things, you understand me? I wanted to do things that would make my parents happy. I wanted to make them happy. So, I did what I believed what would have made them happy. I have a child, and I raised my child with the help of my family and I taught my child to love. I noticed that my friends that were lesbians and gays, their family behaved back in the early 90s, like at them like they could have turned their children, their little nieces and nephews. I was so sad to me, to see this. I thank God that my sisters didn't behave in that way. I babysat my nieces and nephews. I had my daughter and she was nothing like that. People say - I remember getting some ridiculous questions like, 'Aren't you afraid that she becomes like you?' Who is thinking that? You are just raising your child. There were questions that my daughter raised to me about Sodom and Gomorrah, and all those things. And I answered them to the best of my ability."
Janelle Chanona
"What did you answer?"
Simone Hill
"What did I answer? So long ago, Janelle, but nonetheless, my daughter is here. I believe that I raised her well. She's a good person and one wouldn't - because people put labels - If you look, and she was walking on the street, who would know that she has a mother that is a lesbian? Coming back to tie it all together, we are human beings. We are all just like you pops being the camera, walking the streets and other things. We come in all shapes, forms and other things. Some of us are extreme; some of us are more conservative. But, we are human beings at the end of the day. Some people won't like us because some of us are open, and we are true to ourselves."
Simone Hill hopes that one day she will be able to live as a lesbian without harassment and threats of violence, which is why she supports changing local laws to decriminalize sodomy.
Maria Roches - March 31st 2004
"Well I am fighting for my fundamental rights which were violated and abused and I want my job back."
The decriminalization of sodomy is not the first time that differences in religious beliefs and Constitutional rights have resulted in a court case. In 2004, school teacher Maria Roches was "released" from her post at a Roman Catholic institution after she became a single mother. The court later upheld legal arguments that Roches' dismissal was unconstitutional because it violated her right against discrimination based on sex.
Dean Barrow - Maria Roches' Attorney, March 31st 2004
"All of us have to respect the church and especially the Catholic Church but the Constitution our country is supreme. And whenever anything that is done is in conflict with the constitution, then citizens have a right to go to court and to have this declared to be so. In my view that is what is happening here."
Florence Goldson - Human Rights Advocate
"You have the right to your beliefs and there are so many different spiritual beliefs. So, but there are only one set of human rights, and human rights are guaranteed to every single person just by virtue of being born."
Human rights advocate Florence Goldson says all Belizeans should support efforts to change laws that discriminate, including those that decriminalize sodomy.
Florence Goldson
"This is a law that has the potentiality to affect all of us, because all of us - any person that's going to engage any sexual intercourse, and wants the right and freedom to decide on how they will be intimate, can be affected by this law. So then it saddens and angers me that we decide to isolate one group of people, and decide that it's okay to violate their rights, that we all have the right to protection, except for those people, and whoever else we decide are not worthy of protection. The silence, the fear, the intolerance are indicative of the law and what discriminating laws can bring about. So, as a nation, we should ensure that laws like this one, and other laws, because there are laws that discriminate against women, the laws that don't protect children. There are lots of laws that force us into silence, push people to live hidden lives."


Melissa Mossiah
"My greatest desire right now is to be able to share the truth. That if God can set me free, He can set you free. It doesn't matter what, how deep you are in it. He can set you free."
Simone Hill
"I pray that the law gets change, and so that we can all live in harmony. That's what I pray for. So in the long term, I would like to see us whereby we have laws that protect not only homosexuals, but everybody. I hope that everybody's rights get protected and the laws respect that, and that people can respect these things."
In the end, this case is not just about arguing what's in the law books. This case is about Belizeans and their beliefs. If the laws stay the same, homosexuals will continue to feel discriminated against. If the laws are changed, the religious community will feel that Belize is on a slippery slope to damnation. Belizeans will have to determine whether we want to be a society that protects individual lifestyle choices or a society that clings strictly to religious ideals.
The trial has tentatively been set for December.
We'll keep following the story as it draws closer to a trial date... source: http://www.7newsbelize.com/sstory.php?nid=20767&frmsrch=1

Thursday, October 6, 2011

Catfight with Minister Boots

October 6th, 2011

While I can depend on politician to milk a cow, it is sometimes surprising how rights erosion can take place with such ignorance. It is clear however, the present PM has been responsible about issuing any statements and the PUP have been mum so far. We like the context as it gives our case a chance to go through the courts on its merits. Boots Martinez however, is another story link.http://edition.channel5belize.com/archives/60793

News from the Region on Belize's Case and UNAIDS response


October 6th, 2011

While Belize's case  zoom's to December 5th to 9th, with all affidavits in, Dominica, St. Lucia, Barbados, Trinidad and Antigua have commented on the case thus far. What was interesting in Antigua was that the media comments were far different from the actual position made at the Universal Periodic Review. Here is what the country committed to at the UPR:


 At the UPR consideration of Antigua and Barbuda on Tuesday, recommendations relating to sexual orientation and gender identity, including reform of the criminal law, were made by a number of States. Today, the Working Group report came up for adoption, and Antigua and Barbuda gave the following responses:

"67. The following recommendations enjoy the support of Antigua and Barbuda:

67.24 Condemn acts of violence and human rights violations committed against persons because of their sexual orientation or gender identity, and ensure adequate protection for those human rights defenders who work on the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender persons (USA);

67.25 Institute policies and initiatives to address discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity (Canada).


68. The following recommendations will be examined by Antigua and Barbuda which will provide responses in due time, but no later that the 19th session of the Human Rights Council in March 2012:

68.35 Implement public awareness campaigns on discrimination based on sexual preference (Spain).


69. The recommendations below did not enjoy the support of Antigua and Barbuda:

69.17 Abrogate the provisions criminalizing sexual relations between consenting adults of the same sex (France);

69.18 Eliminate legal sanctions against consensual sex acts between adults in private (Canada);

69.19 Repeal all provisions that may be applied to criminalize sexual activity between consenting adults, and which are contrary to its commitment to equality and non-discrimination (Hungary);

69.20 Decriminalize homosexual conduct by reforming the penal code so that for the purposes of prosecution, gross indecency would not apply to private acts between consenting adults (USA);

69.21 Adopt policy and legislative measures to establish a specific framework for the protection against discrimination based on sexual preference along with the abrogation of criminal provisions that criminalize consensual relations between adults of the same sex (Spain)."
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So, Antigua and Barbuda has accepted recommendations to address  SOGI-related violence and discrimination, will consider the possibility of public awareness campaigns, but rejected all recommendations relating to decriminalisation. A scanned copy of the report is attached, and all statements are also available on the UN webcast.

What is interesting is not the formal statements, but the news statements that was circulated in the following way.

AG: Anti-Buggery Law Here To Stay

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ST JOHN’S, Antigua – While he’s softened his language from a few days ago, Attorney General Justin Simon said yesterday he remains resolute that Antigua & Barbuda will not change its anti-buggery law unless there is a mandate from the electorate.
Simon is in Geneva, Switzerland, presenting the national human rights report to the 12th Session of The Universal Periodic Review.
The attorney general told OBSERVER that, yesterday, some of the 31 country delegates posed questions about the twin-island’s stance on homosexuality.
“I had to indicate that the Sexual Offences Act in Antigua does criminalise homosexuality (and) whilst the government is committed to protecting all members of society from harassment and discrimination, violence and any unfair practices because of sexual orientation, we do continue to have the provision which criminalises homosexual behaviour.
“And I also informed and advised them that we do not have a political mandate to change the laws at this state but that we will continue, in terms of informing and educating the public, in terms of international treaty principles which are being accepted and adopted elsewhere,” Simon said.
His response to OBSERVER was less acerbic than his response in a Caribarena.com report of October 3, in which he declared homosexuality morally wrong.
“There will be no change in the law on buggery in Antigua & Barbuda, at least not if I can help it. Being gay is morally wrong, and to be honest personally, I am still homophobic.
“I know they are going to ask me this same question at the Human Rights United Nations meeting I am attending, and I will give them the same answer,” the news portal quoted the AG as saying.
He was responding to an apparent question about the upcoming judicial review of the buggery law in Belize.
The United Belize Advocacy Movement (UNIBAM) is mounting the challenge. As reported in a September 26 article in this newspaper, the leaders of more then 20 Caribbean organisations representing the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community, as well as human rights activists, have pledged support to UNIBAM.
On the ground here, a confidential source said the gay community is quietly monitoring the situation in Belize, which is viewed as a test case that could reverberate around the region.
In defending the existing law, Simon told the news portal “Antigua is still very much led by male and church influences.”
Yesterday, he told OBSERVER he was not aware that conversation he had with Caribarena was for the purposes of a published interview, but that he had maintained, at all times, that he was expressing his “personal position and opinion.”
Speaking on behalf of government to OBSERVER Tuesday, the AG said any change to the legislation would have to be pushed by the people.
“One has to understand that one does not just change laws because we are living within a society where laws and norms have to be accepted and it is important that you do have, when I talk about a political mandate, that it is not a mandate in terms of the government, but it is a mandate of the people based upon their perceptions, based upon what they expect, because there is no point having a law which people are not going to … have general acceptance and respect (for),” Simon said.
The Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC), which has representation in Antigua & Barbuda, said it would not comment publicly on Simon’s assertions.
A regional spokesman who did not want to be identified said CVC has taken note of Simon’s statements but prefers to focus on the Belize case rather than doing or saying anything to derail success. The spokesman said CVC also does not want to cause any disruption for the gay community in Antigua & Barbuda.
President of Women Against Rape (WAR) Alexandrina Wong was less circumspect, saying the attorney general was simply maintaining the status quo.
“He’s yielding to religion and patriarchy,” Wong told OBSERVER.
(More in today’s Daily OBSERVER)


HERE IS UNAIDS RESPONSE TODAY:

By OBSERVER News - Thursday, October 6th, 2011.
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ST JOHN’S, Antigua – A number of representatives at the United Nations (UN) headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, yesterday recommended that Antigua & Barbuda do away with its anti-buggery law.
The recommendations came following Attorney General Justin Simon’s presentation of the country’s human rights policies. As expected, there were several questions and recommendations raised with many focused on the anti-buggery law.
US representative Charles Blaha said homosexuality should be decriminalised, and he also urged the twin-island state to condemn human rights violations based on sexuality.
“We urge Antigua & Barbuda to decriminalise homosexual conduct by reforming the penal code so that for the purposes of prosecution, gross indecency would not apply to private acts between consenting adults,” the US representative said.
“We (also) urge Antigua & Barbuda to condemn acts of violence and human rights violations committed against persons because of their sexual orientation or gender identity and to ensure adequate protection for those human rights defenders who work on the rights of LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) persons,” Blaha added.
The US representative at the UN said discrimination against the LGBT community remains a major concern of the US.
“The criminisalation of homosexual conduct exacerbates homophobic attitudes in the general population and prevents LGBT persons from fully participating in society and taking advantage of opportunities afforded to all other Antiguans,” Blaha said.
Simon also came under pressure on the LGBT matter from other representatives including Spain’s Manuel Alhama Orenes.
“We recommend the adoption of political and legislative measures to set up a specific framework for the protection of discrimination on the grounds of sexual discrimination as well as the striking of legal provisions that criminalise consensual same-sex adult relationships. In a similar vein, we recommend the implementation of public awareness raising campaigns in this area,” Orenes said.
In response, the attorney general, who is a strong proponent of the buggery law, said he does not believe the proposal would receive the support of residents right now. However, he said public opinion could change.
“There is a certain amount of public acceptance, it’s rather acceptance in a rather silent way, but we do not believe that at this stage that we do have the political mandate in respect of changing the laws notwithstanding the fact that the enforcement of those laws are not actively sought,” Simon said.
“The government will continue with its efforts in respect of education and information to ensure that at some later date, that public opinion in respect of this particular matter would certainly adopt the international standards,” Simon added.
Thirty-one country delegates intervened following the presentation of the opening statement by the attorney general on the Human Rights National Report to the Working Group of the Universal Periodic Review in Geneva on Tuesday morning.
By OBSERVER News - Thursday, October 6th, 2011.
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Director of the Caribbean Regional Support Team, UNAIDS Ernest Massiah says the AG’s comments on the Sexual Offences Act has opened a necessary public dialogue.
ST JOHN’S, Antigua – Rather than just an emotive issue about the public’s views on homosexuality, the attorney general’s recent comments about maintaining buggery laws should be viewed as the starting point for an important discussion Director of the Caribbean Regional Support Team, UNAIDS Ernest Massiah said.
“It’s not just about a buggery law. This is about looking at equality, equality of all citizens in all Caribbean countries, and when you start that discussion from that point as opposed to a buggery law, I think then you see a discussion as well as points of convergence that would be different than if you start looking just at a buggery law,” Massiah told OBSERVER from his office on Port-of-Spain, Trinidad.
Attorney General Justin Simon told the delegates at the 12th Session of The Universal Periodic Review, which comprises the 47 member states of the Human Rights Council, that any change in the Sexual Offences Act would have to come as a result as a mandate from the people.
Among other things, the Act criminalises buggery.
The AG is in Geneva, Switzerland, at the meeting, but his comments sparked lively discussion here, with the topic being narrowed down by most people to a conversation on the immorality of homosexuality. The minority has attempted to broaden the scope to a discussion about human rights.
Massiah said Simon’s comments should be viewed as an opportunity to move forward the dialogue on matters like public health.
“There are fundamental issues of public health where the legal framework works against the public health, and that is where one needs to be very clear … because the objective of the law should be to protect the public health,” said Massiah, who holds a doctorate in public health.
The three areas he highlighted where the law has negative impact are in the treatment and prevention of HIV and AIDS; the perpetuation of stigma; and the overall climate of discrimination.
“For example, you cannot provide condoms in prisons because prisons are state-run, and … you know that sex (is) likely to be anal sex. In some countries in the region we have seen ministers of national security saying they’d like to engage in good public health but the law prevents them,” Massiah said.
He also noted that while a case might be made that the buggery law is rarely enforced, a climate exists for those affected by the legislation where they could be subject to what he called “arbitrary discrimination” at any time.
Speaking to Caribarena.com, the attorney general opined that he did not see the law changing anytime soon, since “Antigua is still very much led by male and church influences.”






The Flambouyant Front man


October 6th, 2011

Just when I thought I saw everything, channel 5 news coverage of our award from the Ambassador Fund was tinged with bias when i was described as " UniBAM Flambouyant front man..." Who knew that channel 5 professionalism could fall. A Human Error? we can let this pass. see the news coverage of the event at http://edition.channel5belize.com/archives/61585

Saturday, June 25, 2011

The Reporter Editorial-Just Fascinating

Posted on The Reporter site on 29th April,2011
Posted on this blog: 25th June, 2011

I always love when newspapers misrepresent the facts, but like all things, free speech is free speech. See below the editorial from the reporter:

It has to be clear to all that the campaign by unibam to gain legal recognition for homosexuals and lesbians  is  being sponsored by funding from abroad! Unibam has retained the services of two attorneys from abroad who are Queen’s Counsels, and the leader of unibam has admitted that he getting support from the gay organization known as the Human Dignity Trust.
Unibam also claims it has the support of the Belize AIDS Commission, which is a government-appointed  civil   body established to  reduce the prevalence  of AIDS in Belize. Some of the people serving on this Commission appear to be sympathetic to unibam’s cause, though there has been no official pronouncement on this subject.
A spokesperson for the Commission has disclosed however that the Commission has prepared draft legislation designed to remove the stigma attached to homosexuality and lesbianism, in the hope that people suffering from AIDS will be more willing to come forward for treatment.
These efforts to normalize deviant behavior by removing the taboos are presented in the guise of modern thinking. Laws which discourage homosexual behavior are described as old-fashioned. A new liberalism, which has begun to sweep the Caribbean now argues that the contagion of AIDS, which was greatly assisted by homosexual behavior in the first place, may now be contained by more homosexual behavior that has legal approval.  
What we are seeing in Belize is how lobbyist organizations from abroad spend their money to influence developments in Belize. It began with lobbyists from the United Kingdom who provided money for appeals against capital punishment in Belize.           
This was followed by environmental lobbyists who are opposed to oil exploration in nature reserves, and who are willing to provide money to buy friends and influence people.
The third wave of lobbying activity has now arrived - to legalize homosexual behavior because, its proponents promise, it will help to control the AIDS epidemic.                         
The difficulty with the liberal philosophy is that it  is so deceptively plausible! It will take years of community decay to disprove the garbage inherent in the new ideas. Suspension of the death penalty in Belize has not reduced the volume and frequency of murder! 
Failure to develop our petroleum and petro-chemical potential will not help to liberate Belize from her cycle of poverty and crime.  Legal acceptance of homosexual behavior will not play any significant role in reducing the incidence of AIDS in Belize. 
 The AIDS epidemic   will be controlled by responsible social behavior, not by further licentiousness and debauchery! The allure of the forbidden fruit is always hard to resist. Those who eat of it will indeed have their eyes opened. But only disillusionment and decay await those who believe in its empty promises.

Overturning the Constitution-Paul Rodriguez

Posted on blog: 25th, June, 2011
Posted on the Amandala websited:  10th June,2011
 
Dear Editor,
  
To understand the enormity of what Caleb Orosco is asking our Supreme Court to do, you have to know the features of the Belize Constitution, especially its Preamble and its chapter on individual rights and freedoms.
 
Our Constitution is not unique in admitting the existence of God, but it does so in a simple direct way, giving evidence of the genius of the men who framed it. In paragraph (a) it says that our nation is founded upon principles which acknowledge the supremacy of God.
 
Paragraph (b) tells Belizeans that we are not just a conglomeration of individuals, but a society which must work for the common good.
  
Paragraph (c) proclaims that the will of the people is the basis of governance in Belize.
  
One could have thought that after mentioning those powerful foundational principles contained in (a), (b) and (c) the framers of the Constitution had said enough, but they continued to draw an inevitable conclusion in (d) “that men and institutions remain free only when freedom is founded upon respect for moral and spiritual values and upon the rule of law.”
  
I have seen Caleb Orosco in two television interviews; both times he has asserted that all he wants is to be conceded his right of free sexual expression. With due respect, both times he conjured up the image of a child who throws a tantrum for a lollipop which its mother is refusing him, because he is diabetic.  Good and dutiful mothers always do what is right and best for the child by refusing to deliver the candy to the child.
  
Like a good mother, Belize must refuse to concede to him a right which he thinks he has but really does not, because it does not exist. The right to sexual expression is based on the human biological need to procreate and continue the species.  It is not based on an individual’s desire to experience pleasure.
  
Whether he realizes it or not, what Mr. Orosco is asking Belize to do is to concede that he has an absolute right of privacy to express his sexuality, whether that expression accords with the good of society, or not. 
  
On the other hand, Chapter Two of the Constitution, with abundant clarity, tells me that no right is absolute, that every right must be limited so as not to prejudice the rights and freedoms of others.
   
How will Mr. Orosco’s absolute right of sexual expression prejudice the rights and freedom of others?
  
Once homosexuality is de-criminalized, everyone who has the tendency will be free to openly engage in the lifestyle and promote it to others, reaching into homes and influencing our children in schools. Over 95% of Belizeans believe the homosexual act to be immoral. If I may not say this publicly, is not my right to educate my children as I see fit prejudiced?
  
If Mr. Orosco wins his day in court, it will be a monumental tragedy for Belize. Among other errors that will be re-introduced is the pagan concept that physical pleasure is the greatest good. Then we can kiss goodbye to the socially upbuilding values of self-sacrifice, having a concern for others, putting another first, the willingness to put your life on the line to protect others, etc.
  
As we go through this exercise of determining why we should and must reject Caleb Orosco’s initiative, it is my fervent prayer that Belizeans will review and repossess the greatest social, cultural and civilizational values ever conceived. Among them are: (1) there is one God who exercises a benevolent providence over us; (2) mankind is God’s family; (3) all humans are God’s children and we are all brothers and sisters; (4) suffering pain in doing the right thing is part of God’s plan for us to develop strength of character to save ourselves and others from mediocrity and uselessness.
   
Our Belize is destined for greatness! We will achieve that high estate when we wholeheartedly embrace the values which have from the beginning led to the creation of great societies.
 
Paul Rodriguez